Necropolis: A d20 Puzzle-Adventure for 3 Players

It lies nestled deep in the wooded hills surrounding Craeger’s Crossing, carved from the living rock of the outcroppings which dot the landscape. Evil may not enter. The living may not enter. None who have sought the remains of Sir Valyrian and the Mirror of the Zealot have ever returned. Now it is your chance to perish.

I am now officially releasing Necropolis, a d20 puzzle-adventure I have been working on for quite some time. It is a completely self-contained role-playing puzzle adventure inspired by the infamous Tomb of Horrors. It takes puzzle-dungeoneering to the logical extreme, resulting in a unique experience which does not rely on complicated character builds and abilities.

The Idea

Puzzles have been a staple of my D&D games since I first started playing. Not everyone likes them, sure, but for me and my friends it is a chance to explore a new concept or just work out an issue and feel good about getting it right.

A little over a year ago I sought to make a D&D dungeon for my birthday party, but had the issue of involving players new to role-playing games. After some pondering I considered making a new type of dunegon, one which consisted virtually entirely of puzzles and role-playing as opposed to combat. Thus Necropolis was born.

Making Of

Necropolis v1.0, what is being released here, is the third iteration of the dungeon. It has seen many considerable changes to improve gameplay, including balancing the puzzles, removing dull components or aspects which are all too unclear or not fun. What I have today is, I hope, concise, complete, and set to entertain.

The dungeon puzzles are many and varied, appealing to various types of thinkers. None of the puzzles are particularly hard and can all be done in one sitting. There is even a mechanism for getting hints (at a cost) built right in.

Running It

All you need to run Necropolis is to download the zip file and extract its contents. The dungeon description is located in one pdf file. A second pdf file contains individual rooms plotted in 1" to 5' scale, perfect for D&D miniatures. Raw images are also included should you want to print them out.

Details, of course, are in the Necropolis pdf.


I don't know how the legal system here works, so I have done my best to create my own artwork and create my own content. With the exception of three images (which are credited), everything else is my intellectual property. I hereby grant anyone the right to download and play Necropolis, but please do not sell it without getting my permission.

Special Thanks

Special thanks to my friend Bryan for editing and lots of comments.